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Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. International affairs expert and award-winning author of Special Providence Walter Russell Mead here offers a remarkably clear-eyed account of American foreign policy and the challenges it faces post—September Starting with what America represents to the world community, Mead argues that throughout its history it has been guided by a coherent set of foreign policy objec International affairs expert and award-winning author of Special Providence Walter Russell Mead here offers a remarkably clear-eyed account of American foreign policy and the challenges it faces post—September Starting with what America represents to the world community, Mead argues that throughout its history it has been guided by a coherent set of foreign policy objectives.

Balanced, persuasive, and eminently sensible, Power, Terror, Peace, and War is a work of extraordinary significance on the role of the United States in the world today. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published June 14th by Vintage first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

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Power Terror Peace and War America s Grand Strategy in a World at Risk

More filters. Sort order. Feb 03, Joseph Gagnepain rated it really liked it. Mead has many insights into the structure of the post world of international relations.

Power, Terror, Peace, and War

Power, Terror Peace and War offers some fascinating views into the state of the international community, the clash of civilizations, the role's that individual states are most likely to play and offers a full spectrum of strategies on dealing with modern terrorism. Furthermore, what I like about Mead is his focus on all kinds of power.

Mead goes into much detail about using soft power, sticky power and h Mead has many insights into the structure of the post world of international relations. In addition, if like me, you listen to a lot of NPR when you're driving around and hear the capitol hill staffers throwing around terms like Jeffersonian, Jacksonian, Hamiltonian or Wilsonian, then like me after this book you'll finally know what the heck they're talking about!


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Mead is a dry read. I enjoy that, but it's not for everyone. Aug 18, Dennis Littrell rated it liked it. An uneven but enthusiastic defense of American unilateralism This is largely a justification of American foreign policy. Mead's position is that Bush made mostly the right choices even if some of the planning and execution were not the best.

Along the way I think Mead does a good job of explaining why the current administration believes that preemptive wars and unilateralism are sometimes necessary. He uses a plethora of coinages, American Revivalists, Arabian Fascism, millennial capitalism, harm An uneven but enthusiastic defense of American unilateralism This is largely a justification of American foreign policy.

He uses a plethora of coinages, American Revivalists, Arabian Fascism, millennial capitalism, harmonic convergence, Wilsonian Revivalism, Fordism, etc. To be honest I got a little lost among these labels and had to frequently turn to the index to look up their first use so as to keep them straight in my head. Mead's approach is bipartisan and he strives to make it non-religious as well, although ending the book with a quote from Christ is perhaps not the best way to achieve that, nor is some seeming naivete about the double meaning of the word "revival.

Nonetheless he also quotes the Prophet; and the label he pins on Middle Eastern terrorists, "Arabian Fascists," attempts to secularize the conflict. Of course he can use all the labels he wants some of which are clearly euphemistic while others are attempts at political correctness and bipartisanship ; regardless the conflict between the West and the terrorists in the Middle East will continue to be played out in quasi-religious terms. In addition to labels, Mead also uses special terms to define American power. There is "sharp," "soft," "sticky," and "sweet" power. Sharp power is military force and it is, to use Mead's words, "a very practical and unsentimental thing.

Sweet power is pretty much the same thing as soft power, "the power of attraction to American ideals, culture and power. Thus Mead writes, "We do not want to Indeed Mead writes "that, for neoconservatives and Revival Wilsonians generally, American power is itself the summum bonum of world politics.

Sometimes Mead's tone gets away from him and we are treated to indecorous outbursts. For example, while justifying the invasion of Iraq as a part of the greater war on terror, Mead writes, "This was a war, and the enemy had to learn who was the strongest and, if it came to that, the most ruthless. At other times he is a bit snide, as when he remarks that "stroking Europe only seemed to increase Europe's already inflated sense of its importance in the world of American foreign policy.

However I don't think this is the way we can best achieve American values and goals in the world. In this way he reveals the politician in his soul rather than the professional journalist that he is. For example he writes, "The United States is not going to slow down its capitalist development to avoid offending the sensitivities of foreign countries Is that the development of the Brazilian jungle or the Iraqi oil pipelines or is that about some infrastructure at home? One can discern Mead's bottom line position from this statement on page "A perfectly justifiable military action against the rogue regime in Iraq was effectively and widely portrayed as an assault by the United States against the foundations of international order.

Where I find myself in substantial agreement with Mead is that the structure of the United Nations must be amended in such a way as to reflect the actual distribution of power in the world. As Mead notes it is not right that for example France should have veto power over the rest of the world, or that a country with a million people should have the same voting power as a country with a billion people.

Aug 17, Caitlin Moroney rated it really liked it. A rare voice in that while pushing a particular idea of American foreign policy and agenda for what it should be in the future he maintains a balanced and fair stance in evaluating the variety of viewpoints in and outside of the U. The book covers a lot of ground, but doesn't delve deeply into much of it, instead glossing over numerous topics, which I think is unfortunate; however, Mead is upfront about this in the book's introduction, so I give him credit for tha A rare voice in that while pushing a particular idea of American foreign policy and agenda for what it should be in the future he maintains a balanced and fair stance in evaluating the variety of viewpoints in and outside of the U.

Along the way I think Mead does a good job of explaining why the current administration believes that preemptive wars and unilateralism are sometimes necessary. He uses a plethora of coinages, American Revivalists, Arabian Fascism, millennial capitalism, harm An uneven but enthusiastic defense of American unilateralism This is largely a justification of American foreign policy.

He uses a plethora of coinages, American Revivalists, Arabian Fascism, millennial capitalism, harmonic convergence, Wilsonian Revivalism, Fordism, etc.

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To be honest I got a little lost among these labels and had to frequently turn to the index to look up their first use so as to keep them straight in my head. Mead's approach is bipartisan and he strives to make it non-religious as well, although ending the book with a quote from Christ is perhaps not the best way to achieve that, nor is some seeming naivete about the double meaning of the word "revival.

Nonetheless he also quotes the Prophet; and the label he pins on Middle Eastern terrorists, "Arabian Fascists," attempts to secularize the conflict. Of course he can use all the labels he wants some of which are clearly euphemistic while others are attempts at political correctness and bipartisanship ; regardless the conflict between the West and the terrorists in the Middle East will continue to be played out in quasi-religious terms. In addition to labels, Mead also uses special terms to define American power.

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There is "sharp," "soft," "sticky," and "sweet" power. Sharp power is military force and it is, to use Mead's words, "a very practical and unsentimental thing. Sweet power is pretty much the same thing as soft power, "the power of attraction to American ideals, culture and power.

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Thus Mead writes, "We do not want to Indeed Mead writes "that, for neoconservatives and Revival Wilsonians generally, American power is itself the summum bonum of world politics. Sometimes Mead's tone gets away from him and we are treated to indecorous outbursts. For example, while justifying the invasion of Iraq as a part of the greater war on terror, Mead writes, "This was a war, and the enemy had to learn who was the strongest and, if it came to that, the most ruthless. At other times he is a bit snide, as when he remarks that "stroking Europe only seemed to increase Europe's already inflated sense of its importance in the world of American foreign policy.

However I don't think this is the way we can best achieve American values and goals in the world.

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In this way he reveals the politician in his soul rather than the professional journalist that he is. For example he writes, "The United States is not going to slow down its capitalist development to avoid offending the sensitivities of foreign countries Is that the development of the Brazilian jungle or the Iraqi oil pipelines or is that about some infrastructure at home?

One can discern Mead's bottom line position from this statement on page "A perfectly justifiable military action against the rogue regime in Iraq was effectively and widely portrayed as an assault by the United States against the foundations of international order. Where I find myself in substantial agreement with Mead is that the structure of the United Nations must be amended in such a way as to reflect the actual distribution of power in the world. As Mead notes it is not right that for example France should have veto power over the rest of the world, or that a country with a million people should have the same voting power as a country with a billion people.

Aug 17, Caitlin Moroney rated it really liked it. A rare voice in that while pushing a particular idea of American foreign policy and agenda for what it should be in the future he maintains a balanced and fair stance in evaluating the variety of viewpoints in and outside of the U. The book covers a lot of ground, but doesn't delve deeply into much of it, instead glossing over numerous topics, which I think is unfortunate; however, Mead is upfront about this in the book's introduction, so I give him credit for tha A rare voice in that while pushing a particular idea of American foreign policy and agenda for what it should be in the future he maintains a balanced and fair stance in evaluating the variety of viewpoints in and outside of the U.

The book covers a lot of ground, but doesn't delve deeply into much of it, instead glossing over numerous topics, which I think is unfortunate; however, Mead is upfront about this in the book's introduction, so I give him credit for that. Jan 24, Richie rated it it was amazing. Powerful and insightful. Mead shows a level of honest evaluation, both praise and criticism, of primarily the Bush but also the Clinton presidencies.

I learned more about the complexities of foreign affairs and domestic economics than I did in most business classes. In the end he gives practical and specific hopes and plans for Ame Powerful and insightful. In the end he gives practical and specific hopes and plans for America to help the rest of the world and ourselves. The book makes some good points about shifts in american foreign policy and the roles that Bush has had in enacting these changes that are generally perceived to be undesirable.

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It's a very fast read, and i'm not sure that i like the book a whole ton, but it does have good information in it. My indifference in the book is likely to be a result of my general ignorance on historical events.

One really good point about the book is that Mead ties the american people into the issues facing the nation in some detail. He discusses our current status as americans as being a society of Wilsonian and Hamiltonian people for the most part and relates our actions as a country back to this concept.

Apr 10, Bethany rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction , history-politics-war. I think Walter Russell Mead is a genius.